in Mac apps, organization, review

Yojimbo 2 Review

Yojimbo was one of the better information managers on the market when I reviewed it back in March 2008. Yojimbo 2 was released last November. This new release sports more than a new logo (as an aside, I’m sad to see the old logo go. It went well with the product name). Anyway, the new version addresses most of the concerns I had about the first version—the main item being that Yojimbo’s tagging structure needed work, particularly in light of the fact that Yojimbo emphasizes the tag as a primary organization tool. Now, that problem is fixed. Here, then, is a brief look at what’s new.

Tag Explorer

The single most important feature of Yojimbo 2 is the new Tag Explorer. It’s a clever implementation. The Bare Bones team says it’s a way to look at your collection of items from the ‘inside out.’ What that means is best understood by actually using it, but I’ll attempt to explain how it works in words by way of example.

Say I want to sift through all the items in my Library to find specific documents related to this blog (tag: ‘vfd’) and Linux (tag: ‘linux’). Assume I haven’t created any subfolders to organize my files, so I start by selecting my Library to reveal a list of all the files contained within my Yojimbo database.

Once I select my Library, the Tag Explorer reveals all tags used throughout my entire collection, along with an annotation of the number of times the tag is used. In my case, I have 32 items in my Library marked with ‘vfd.’ I want to find items tagged with both ‘vfd’ and ‘Linux,’ so I start by selecting ‘vfd’ from the Tag Explorer. Three things then happen:

1. The items in my Library are instantly filtered so that I only see the specific files tagged with ‘vfd.’

2. The tag filter I’ve chosen (‘vfd’) is promoted to the Tag Filter bar (new in Yojimbo 2) that appears above the list of Library items. If you’ve used tagging in other apps, the appearance of the ‘promoted’ tag will be familiar. It makes it very easy to see which filter is currently being applied to your document list. Take a look at the screen shot if you want to see what I’m talking about.

3. The Tag Explorer view changes to reveal only tags related to ‘vfd.’ What does ‘related to’ mean? In my case, I have many items that use the tag ‘vfd’ that are also tagged with other keywords. So what I see in the Tag Explorer is that, of the 36 items in my library tagged with ‘vfd,’ four items are also tagged with the word ‘linux,’ 14 items are also tagged ‘post drafts,’ two items are also tagged ‘wordpress,’ and so on.

If I then choose the ‘linux’ tag from the Tag Explorer, that tag is then promoted to the Tag Filter bar. I now have two filter parameters in place: ‘vfd’ and ‘linux.’ And, as you would expect, I’m presented with a list of the items in my Library that are tagged with the words ‘vfd’ AND ‘linux.’ At this point, the Tag Explorer bar appears empty because there are no other related tags. In other words, I’ve drilled down as far as I can go.

Once I’m ready to search for something else, I deselect the tags ‘vfd’ and ‘linux’ from the Tag Filter Bar. Voilà, I’m back to the complete list of all items in my Library.

Yojimbo still features the handy, familiar option of organizing with static folders, in which you can collect whatever you want. But the best way to manage folders with this app continues to be the Tag Collection. These smart folders work as you’d expect: choose the tag (or tags) you’re interested in, and the folder will magically populate with items that match that criteria. New to Yojimbo 2, tag collections now allow you to choose if you want your folder to group together all items in your Library that match a selection of tags, or any items that match a selection of tags. That’s very useful.

There is one other improvement to mention related to tags, and that’s the Tag editor. You’ll find it under Window > Show Tags. The editor presents a list of all of the tags used in your Library, along with number counts. It’s the same view that you see from the Tag Explorer if you select your Library as a starting point. What’s special about this view is that it allows you to easily batch manage tags: change a tag name, delete a tag, or merge two different tags. These changes are implemented Library-wide. It works great, but be careful. The ‘merge’ and ‘delete’ tag commands cannot be undone. Also note that the merge command works with as many tags as you wish to merge together, but your newly-merged tag set will adopt the name of the top-most tag in your selected group. The Tag editor is actually a dual-purpose tool that also contains a Label editor. Here, you can batch change label names and label colors. You can also delete labels. However, you can’t merge multiple labels.

I think Yojimbo nails it with the new tagging features. However, if you only have 100 or so items in your Library, you may find that organizing your items by folder remains the easiest way to go. But if you’re dealing with a huge Library with items tagged with multiple names, it can be a huge time saver. My only complaint with the new tagging setup is that the Tag editor (Window > Show Tags) is not easy to get to. It’s a minor thing, but it’d be nice to have a key combo option to pull this up. It might also be nice to have the option to place a shortcut (icon) for ‘Tags’ in Yojimbo’s Toolbar for easy access.

Other Refinements

There are number of other nice refinements in Yojimbo 2, my favorite of which is the improved Quick Input panel. As in the last version of Yojimbo, selecting F8 pulls up this panel. And as before, Yojimbo guesses which kind of item you’re trying to create based on what’s in your clipboard. It typically guesses correctly in my experience. What’s new here is that you can now add more metadata to the item you’re creating (name, tags, flags, label, and comments). This makes the Quick Input much like that of EagleFiler, and it’s a handy way to knock out the finer points of filing right from the start. Chances are (if you’re like me) you won’t otherwise get around to it later.

The Drop Drock also received a minor refresh in this update. New is the ability to drag and drop items to a Tag Collection to auto-assign tags; and you can now flag items by dropping on a ‘Flagged Items’ zone. As I said in my EagleFiler review, I prefer this kind of screen-edge style for Drop Docks because it’s easier to access. Truth told, though, I’m not a big Drop Dock fan for purely aesthetic reasons. I prefer to use a key command to enter new items. That said, Yojimbo does a good job with this.

Searching for items in Yojimbo is also supposed to be faster now, but I didn’t notice the difference. That’s likely because my Library is not that big. Search was already very fast in my experience. Added to the speed improvement, search now auto-completes tag and label names for you as you type. You can also refine where you’re searching by holding down the Option key and selecting multiple collections (folders).

While I think the new Tag Explorer is great, I tend to use the Search function with more frequency because it’s faster. By selecting the magnifying glass in the search field, you can choose to search only tags, content, the comment field, name of an item, or all of the above. I like to leave mine set to ‘Tag.’ I found that I could generally find what I’m looking for faster this way than with the Tag Explorer. Again, with a really large Library, this likely wouldn’t work as well. The more items in your Library, the more tags you have, and the harder it will be to remember the name you used to tag something.

Last up, Yojimbo 2 also improved their PDF workflow in this release. If you choose to print an item from another application and save as a PDF to Yojimbo, you now how an option to add metadata to the PDF before it’s printed.

The Verdict

For long-time users of Yojimbo, this new release delivers some great improvements that make it a worthwhile upgrade. For new users, it remains one of the best solutions I’ve seen to easily capture snippets of info, mainly because it’s so easy to use.

1. Could I figure out how to use the application with minimal fuss (without documentation)?

As I noted in my first Yojimbo review, the developer maintains that there is ‘no learning curve.’ This is largely true, although you may find the Tag Explorer a little weird at first until you get used to it.

2. Was I still enthusiastic about using the application after a week of use?

Yes. With the addition of more robust tagging support and improvements in ease of adding metadata to files, Yojimbo has answered the mail for most of the issues I had with the first release.

3. How well does the app integrate into the Mac OS?

Very well. There are a variety of ways to get things into Yojimbo that are all tightly integrated. Yojimbo supports MobileMe syncing for other Yojimbo installations on your network. Yojimbo data is also Spotlight indexed.

4. How did the program ‘feel?’ How ‘Mac-like’ is it?

This application has a great feel to it. The minimalist interface and the eye-catching iconography make it a real pleasure to use.

Conclusion

How does Yojimbo fit on the triangle? I’d say it’s about 25% file organizer; 70% notebook; 5% visualizer.

EagleFiler Triangle Plot

So far, I’ve reviewed EagleFiler and Yojimbo. Yojimbo is a reliable, speedy and handy tool. With this new release, I think Bare Bones maintains the products broad appeal, especially for those who want a general-purpose, easy to use snippet box to hold a wide range of items for easy retrieval. The new tagging features are easy to use and may get some people who’ve never tried this organization method to give it a go. Those who rely heavily on tagging will most appreciate this update, though.

EagleFiler still stands out to me as a better ‘industrial strength’ choice for file organization, and I’m still partial to a flat file storage solution vs. the database storage of Yojimbo. The main reason for that is about my future usage: if I stop using EagleFiler at some point in the future, I don’t have to export my files. There’s nothing to export. And all of my tags and labels will be maintained. However, when I export my Yojimbo items, the tags and labels are lost (unless I’m missing something?). If I intend to keep using Yojimbo forever, this wouldn’t be an issue. But I’m not sure I want to make such a long-term commitment.

I haven’t decided if I’ll upgrade to Yojimbo 2 yet. I’m going to wait until I finish this review series to make the choice. I very well may end up using more than one tool, and there’s certainly room for that in this category of Mac app.

Yojimbo is offered at $39. An upgrade version is available for registered version 1.0 users for $20. There is a full 30-day trial available to test it out.

Next up on the Mac MIP review series is an examination of Together from Reinvented Software. I’m just beginning my trial period now, so please be patient!

  1. Thanks for the review.

    There is always the possibility to set keyboard shortcuts to menu items in the global System Preferences of Mac OS X. You can do this globally or just for the application, in your case “Yojimbo”.

    I think that the upgrade price of $20 is a bit steep, especially when you consider that something like the tag explorer was missing since 1.0 and should really be a 1.5 feature. While I appreciate Yojimbo’s minimalism, the update price feels more like a subscription fee for current users than a traditional software upgrade. Although I had a couple thousand of entries in my Yojimbo database, I exported all of them and started over with another application just because of this.

  2. Good points. I have to say when looking at Together and EagleFiler, I’m probably not going to upgrade my Yojimbo. Still, I guess if it’s ones snippet manager of choice, it would be worth the cost to get the new tagging features.

    Sorry for the delayed response – and thanks for the comment.

Comments are closed.