EagleFiler Review

EagleFiler. While I don’t think EagleFiler is as visually appealing as some of the other offerings out there in this genre, I think it more than makes up for it in utility. It is, at heart, a power tool.

At first blush, EagleFiler may appear to be little more than an alternative to using the Finder and Spotlight. Like these Apple tools, EagleFiler allows you to store, label, tag, sort, and find documents and media. However, this tool sets itself apart in many useful ways. It’s very easy to get your documents into EagleFiler via a system-wide one-click shortcut. It provides an integrated way to more easily manage metadata (tags, labels, notes) for the files you import. It also gives you a place to store items that aren’t as easy to manage in the Finder like archived Web pages, important Emails, and notes. And it allows you to create multiple libraries of information so that, for example, you can manage your personal and work files separately.

EagleFiler puts all of these tools together in a single, familiar interface that aims to place the focus of your effort where it should be: on doing work with your documents, instead of working to find your documents. I found that it does this job quite well, but it does take some getting used to. While it’s easy enough to start using right away, a few trips to the 125-page user manual are necessary to start using it well. Let’s start by taking a look at how you get your files into the application.

Capturing Data

EagleFiler captures pretty much anything: documents, images, audio, video, individual emails or entire mailboxes, chat transcripts, bookmarks, text clippings, folders containing multiple items, and more.

You can add items in a wide variety of ways. For starters, you can drag any file or folder and drop it on the application window, on the dock icon, or on an optional EagleFiler ‘drop pad’ that sits on your desktop. You can also add an item by invoking a keyboard shortcut. How do you decide which method to use? It depends on how much you care about where your file goes and if you want to add metadata to the file at the import stage.

I don’t care for the drop-stuff-right-in-the-app method. I think this method is clumsy and prone to error (i.e. it’s easy to drop the file in the wrong place). It is, however, useful to drag a file to the application window if you want to embed an image, video, text or whatever into an existing rich text document. You just need to remember that this embeds the file in an existing document. It doesn’t add the item as a discrete entry in your library.

EagleFiler To Import FolderThere are yet a couple of other ways to enter data. One way we haven’t covered is the special ‘To Import (Library Name)’ folder created by EagleFiler. You’ll find this special folder wherever you choose to store your EF files (one per every library you create). This is a special folder in that EagleFiler doesn’t need to be running for you to add files. Simply drag stuff in there. The next time you fire up EF, the app will import the items. Per a suggestion in the EF user manual, you can optionally create an alias of this folder in the dock for quick access.

The other way is to right-click on an item and choose the ‘EagleFiler: Import’ option from the OS X Services drop-down menu. Note that this will only work if you already have an open library.

From the developer: “This works whether or not EagleFiler or a library is open. If no library is open, EagleFiler will ask you to open one, and then you can click the Import button to send the file to that library”.

There are clearly plenty of options for importing files and folders. Some might say there are too many options, but I think this is a strength. I spent considerable time on this because it’s an important attribute for a tool that is all about capturing and managing files. The tricky part for a new user is finding the method that’s most comfortable and sticking with it until its routine. For me, the shortcut key works 95 percent of time. One quibble: when you right-click on a record or one a group of selected records in an EagleFiler window, the drop-down menu includes an option to import to EagleFiler. This should not be there.

From the developer: “The ‘Services’ submenu is added by the OS. As far as I know, it’s not editable by the application. You’ll see the same thing, e.g. in OmniFocus.”

If you try to do it, EagleFiler will present you with a pop-up Error window which will tell you it can’t import the items because they’re already in your library (provided you don’t allow duplicates in your library, which is an option in the preferences). I suppose some people may have a need for duplicating items in the library, but most won’t. Why would you want to import items to EagleFiler that are already in EagleFiler? A handier option would be to include a right-click shortcut to import an item or items to a different library.

Another quibble with the right-click menu, since we’re on the topic: it includes a ‘Show Info’ option, which opens up the Finder’s ‘Get Info’ panel. There is no option to inspect an item or items (modify notes, title, tags) from this menu, and there should be. The only way I could find to get to the inspector for an item already in the library is by clicking on a button in the Toolbar. Given that you’ll more likely need to add or change labels, tags, notes, or a title for an item more than you need to view the item’s Finder’s info, it seems like a glaring omission that this choice is not presented in the right-click menu. Perhaps many users will choose to always leave the inspector window open. I prefer to open it only when I need it.

From the developer: “Thanks for the suggestion. You can also open the Info inspector from the Window menu or using the keyboard shortcut. Again, the contents of the Services menu are added by the OS, so it’s not as if I’m choosing to put the Finder’s Info command in the menu instead of EagleFiler’s.”

So far, we’ve only talked about importing preexisting data. EagleFiler is also a handy note creation tool. You can create new RTF files at will and, as I mentioned previously, embed items such as images or audio in an RTF document. The rich text editor included in EagleFiler meets all of the basic formatting needs for a simple document, including a variety of styles, spacing, and (handily) outlining options. While you won’t find special note-taking items in EF (here I’m thinking about Yojimbo, which includes special forms to add serial numbers and passwords), I didn’t miss these extras. EF is flexible enough to add whatever you want in a note. If you want to store passwords and serials, there are better tools for the job (1Password).

From the developer: “EagleFiler doesn’t have built-in special note-taking forms, but you can add your own using the stationery feature.

 

Organizing, Finding, Modifying Files

Now let’s take a look at how you work with documents in EagleFiler. The first thing to highlight is that you aren’t locked into dumping all of your data in one giant database (called a ‘Library’ in EagleFiler). While you may prefer to keep it simple and maintain one library, you’re free to create as many as you wish. I’ve created one for personal items and one for work. This alone is a big organizational boost from that of the Finder. You can even keep multiple libraries simultaneously open so you can ferry files to the repository of your choice.

With a given library, you’ll note that the interface is much like that of Apple Mail. There’s a left column in which you are presented with different ways of sorting through your data. And there’s a right column in which you see a list of your selected documents. Underneath this list is the familiar preview of the currently selected item.

Organizing files is a simple endeavor. You may create static folders and drop items in those folders. Or you may create rule-based smart folders to filter all of the records in your library based on criteria of your choice. Lastly, you can tag your files. As you add tags, the tag list in the left column will automatically update.

To search for particular items or items, use the keyword search pane at the top of the app window (just like Spotlight, only faster), or use filter out what you want using your user-created smart folders or tags. EagleFiler includes some built-in smart folders (Recently Added, Recently Modified, and Untagged) and tags (flagged, note, unread, as well as some additional mail-specific tags). This is a nice touch, but you can’t modify these. I see no reason why the built-in tags and folders should not be user-editable. I also couldn’t find the option to add icons to user-created tags (perhaps the developer could include a small library of additional icons from which I could choose, or allow user-created icons to be pasted in). The visual cues these little icons provide are handy, evidenced by Yojimbo’s smart folder icons for photos, web archives, bookmarks, and archives.

From the developer: “You can edit the colors and abbreviation symbols for the built-in tags. The names are not editable because these tags have special meaning within EagleFiler. If you could change the names, there would be all sorts of issues importing from other applications, moving files from other libraries, restoring from backups, etc. You can edit the abbreviation symbols by choosing Window > Show Tags. They are text (Unicode characters) so pasting images is not supported. Click the Characters button to access the available symbols (You can also type regular letters on the keyboard).”

The tagging power of the app is a great strength, but it could be better. You can tag an item manually, or you can drag it to an existing tag folder to have the item adopt that tag. Once you enter a tag, EagleFiler will remember it and attempt to auto-complete your word with future entries. It works well, but there’s one thing that bugs me. If you’re used to the tagging functions in a program like Things, you’ll notice that tag sorting in EagleFiler doesn’t work the same way. In Things, if you shift-select multiple tags you are presented with only those items that meet all conditions (e.g., which items are tagged with both ‘tag1’ AND ‘tag2’). In EagleFiler, shift-selecting multiple tags shows you all items that use the selected tags (‘tag1’ OR ‘tag2’). I think the way Things handles tags makes more sense — it’s why most people would select more than one tag, right? I’d also love to see EagleFiler add the ability to create hierarchical (nested) tags as one can using Things. NOTE: You can create nested tags. See below.

From the developer: “EagleFiler is going for consistency with other applications like Mail, where selecting more than one source shows the union. I’m considering making it an option to show the intersection, but it’s not totally clear how it should work. What if you select two folders? Or a folder and a tag? You can create a tag hierarchy using drag and drop. Or select a tag and click “+” or choose “New Tag” to make a new child tag.”

Now on to file modification. Let’s start with batch change — useful if, say, you want to add a tag to thirty documents at once. There are several ways to get this done. It works with a key combo (shift + command + B) or by going to the menu bar and selecting Records > Batch Change. A ‘batch change’ button also automatically appears on the bottom shelf of the app window if you have multiple items selected. This is usually the way I access this function. The only thing missing is for the developer to add a quick-link icon for batch changes to the Toolbar (as a customization option), but I don’t think most people will miss not having it there.

The way EagleFiler handles encryption may be of concern to some users. Unlike Yojimbo, which allows per-item encryption, EagleFiler only allows you to encrypt your files at the library level. You either encrypt your entire library, or nothing. I’d like the option to encrypt individual files, but as I understand it, this is a trade-off for having files stored outside of a database (see next section for more on file storage). Having said that, library encryption is a handy way to store libraries on a thumb drive or in Dropbox to access elsewhere, as everything is self-contained in the secure disk image. Once I got used to, I started to appreciate it.

Note from the developer: “I think per-item encryption should be of concern because (1) The index is unencrypted. So either your data is exposed or the encrypted items can’t be indexed for searching; and (2) If you import an item and then later make it encrypted, the unencrypted data may still be stored on the disk. So I think it’s simpler and safer to encrypt at the library level.”

Finally, a few words about modifying files within and outside of EagleFiler. While it’s easy to edit your documents in external programs by double-clicking on or right-clicking on an item and choosing the ‘Open With’ command (defaults are taken from your Mac OS ‘Open With’ preferences), you need to let EagleFiler know you changed a file externally if you want the program to be able to monitor the health of your files. Without getting into too much detail, if you only ever use EagleFiler to manage and modify your files, then you don’t need to worry about this. If you aren’t worried about maintaining the long-term integrity of your files, then you don’t need to worry about this.

If you do want to maintain the ability to monitor the integrity of your files and to accurately check for duplicate files, you need to use the ‘Update Checksum’ command every time you modify a file outside of EF to let it know you did so. A checksum, non-technically speaking, is a way to digitally check if a file has errors. If you don’t manually update the checksum on your files that you externally edit, EagleFiler has no way of knowing if the changes in the file were legit or if the changes indicate corruption. If you do keep your files updated in this manner, you can periodically check your files using ‘Verify’ to see if everything is OK.

It’s not a show-stopper if you don’t do this, just know that if you don’t, the app has no way to detect problems with your files. I think it’s worth the effort. I do, though, think that EagleFiler could help us out a little more here. While you can add ‘Update Checksum’ and ‘Verify’ to the Toolbar, these items are not there by default. Another option might be for the program to display a pop-up reminder when you save back an externally edited file to remind you to update the checksum (or, better yet, a pop-up with a button to update the checksum as you save it back to the library). The checksum and verify tools are an important way to keep your files healthy for the long-term, and I think the developer could do a better job at making this easier to do.

From the developer: “Agreed. I definitely need to make it easier for people to use checksums and still edit from other apps.”

As it is now, I’d wager most users never use these features. That’s a shame, because it’s one of the features that make EagleFiler stand out. By the way, this is something that you wouldn’t have to worry about if all of your files were stored in an enclosed database (like Yojimbo does).

From the developer: “With a database, all the access to the data would go through the app, so theoretically it could update the checksums automatically (with the tradeoff that it’s impossible to modify the files with another app). But, as far as I know, none of the database apps actually do this; they have no way to check the data integrity at all.”

There are trade-offs for having your files stored externally, which we’ll talk about next.

How Your Files are Stored

It’s always a good idea to have a basic understanding of how a given app handles your data, especially when you are entrusting your most important files to said app. Many info management tools on the market store all of your data in a database. While this isn’t usually a problem, it can be an issue down the road if it’s not properly managed. With EagleFiler, only a small OS X Core Data SQL database is used for each library to keep track of metadata such as what types of files you have, where the files are, and when you added or changed the files. The files, however, are not stored in a database. They exist in an open format, right in the Finder.

This means that’s there’s no need to worry about exporting items from a database down the road, because there is no database to worry about. There’s also no need to worry about losing carefully crafted metadata should you stop using this tool, as it’s all saved with the file in Spotlight-friendly format. And you don’t need to worry as much about database corruption. Even if your EagleFiler database gets corrupted, is accidentally deleted, or is destroyed, your files will still be sitting there in your Finder, complete with metadata in tact. I like this. While I wouldn’t hesitate to collect all of the documents on my system within EagleFiler, I wouldn’t want to collect all of my documents in a program that stored them in an enclosed database.

An important caveat: while your files are in plain view and may be manipulated outside of the program via the Finder, don’t do it unless you’ve stopped using the program. This sort of file system is immensely appealing because your files are not locked up in a database. It means that you can stop using the app at any time without worrying about exporting your stuff. However, while you are using EagleFiler, remember that it’s doing the job of monitoring and managing these files. If you modify or move things around add, delete, or move files in the Finder, EagleFiler will no longer be able to properly do that job for you.

If you choose to encrypt a library, your files are stored a bit differently. They’re placed in a password-protected sparse image bundle. What you need to know is that this file must be opened and your password entered to view the protected library. Once you open up it up, a disk image mounts on the desktop. All of your files reside inside this image. To close this library, you must close the library in EagleFiler, then eject the disk image on your desktop. I don’t have any issues with this, but I will say that it’s not very elegant and may put some people off. It’s annoying that the encrypted file only shows up in EagleFiler’s ‘open recent’ menu item when it’s opened. If it’s closed, you’ll have to find it in the Finder or search for it in Spotlight. To make it easier to work with an encrypted library, I found it’s easiest to create a shortcut to the sparse image (in the dock or on the desktop).

It’s worth noting that you can store files for EagleFiler in your Dropbox or SugarSync account to access your files from multiple Macs. There’s an important caveat, though: if you use file color labels or custom icons, those items will be lost using these services because the services don’t fully support Mac files. However, you can create an encrypted library for use on these services that will maintain all of your metadata (as it stores your files in an encrypted self-contained disk image).

 

Verdict

 

1. Could I figure out how to use the app with minimal fuss (w/o documentation)?

I could figure out the basic functions of the program, but I didn’t really get what it could do until I read the documentation. It’s quite a powerful tool, but only if you slog through some of the documentation. If you’re going to invest in the app and entrust it to managing your files, it pays to get to know it well. If you’re looking for a light manager to store snippets and occasional documents, it may be more power than you need. It’s a solid choice, though, if you’re looking for an app to take over the management of most (if not all) of the documents in your digital life.

2. Was I still enthusiastic about using the app after several weeks of use?

I’ve just completed my 30-day trial, and I’ve grown enthusiastic to the point of dependancy. That speaks well for EagleFiler. I would say this app gave me much better focus into my documents, something that the Finder lacks. It also provided me with the basic note-taking/storage needs that I enjoyed while using Yojimbo. Finally, because the database is only storing metadata, it’s a light-weight program in terms of CPU usage. I have no issues with leaving it running all the time. That made it easy to start using it as my central file repository. While it fully meets my file organizer needs, it only met some of my note-taking needs. That isn’t necessarily a criticism. What I’m saying is that I have other solutions to meet my snippet storage needs (JustNotes for non-sensitive notes (a free program that syncs with Simplenote on my iPhone), and 1Password (a popular paid app that stores my sensitive notes, passwords). For those notes that I don’t store in JustNotes or 1Password, EagleFiler does the job.

3. How well does the app integrate into the Mac OS?

Quite well. As evidenced in the section on entering data, there are many ways to get things done with this app. My one complaint is that some of the EagleFiler commands (inspect, verify, checksum) could be better integrated within the application.

4. How did it feel?

For users of Apple Mail and a host of other Apple and third-party apps built in OS X, the layout and basic functions of EagleFiler will be immediately familiar. From a visual perspective, I’m underwhelmed by the application and tag iconography employed by EagleFiler. It’s a minor point, but making these icons a bit more stylish might make this app feel a bit friendlier and more accessible. Compare the look and feel of EF with Yojimbo and you’ll see what I mean. Looks are important. I’m not asking for eye candy. Rather, I’m asking for a more elegance in appearance to help inspire users to dive into this powerful application.

Conclusion

How does EagleFiler fit on the triangle? I’d say it’s about 75% file organizer; 20% notebook; 5% visualizer

EagleFiler Triangle Plot

The file organizer and notebook percentages are fairly obvious, but you may wonder why I gave it 5% visualization. It’s because it can be used to manage and organize projects within a library or in multiple libraries; its note-taking capabilities include support for outlining; and a good system of smart folders and tags can be a real handy tool to not only organize your files and notes, but to see how they fit together. As a file manager and note organizer EagleFiler works impressively as advertised. There are plenty of choices out there, though, if you’re looking for a more powerful visualization tool.

I didn’t hit on all of the features of this app, but hopefully hit the highlights. EagleFiler is a compelling alternative to the Finder for organizing files, and a competent note-taking tool. Is it worth the $30 price of admission? I think it is, but only if you take the time to learn how to use it. While it’s not necessary to read the entire 125-page user manual that ships with the software, it is necessary to peruse the first few chapters to understand how to tap into some key features. Those features are what transform EF from a simple Finder alternative into a tool that can help to make your information better perform for you.

EagleFiler offers a 30-day trial.

MIP: Making Info Perform

It’s time to (re)start the Mac information manager series, a project I began a year and a half ago. I now (finally!) have the time to dedicate some time to this. What follows is a brief synopsis of what I’ve already written about, presented so that it’s not necessary to refer back to older posts. I also set the stage for where I intend to go with the series from this point forward.

Here, then, is a recap:

You may be familiar with the archaic acronym PIM (Personal Information Manager). As I said in a previous post, I think this term is hopelessly broad and meaningless. Every program used on a home computer is, in a sense, a personal info manager. For the purpose of these reviews, then, I’ve decided to ditch PIM. I’m adopting a new acronym I’ll call MIP (Making Info Perform). It’s a bit cheesy, but I think MIP better captures a certain spirit of the myriad info management solutions out there today: the promise is to not only harness the chaos that is your data, but to feed it back to you with ease, and in ways that foster insight and creativity. That’s what I expect out of my info management tools, at any rate.

Such tools are increasingly necessary to manage the flood of text, documents, PDFs, images, bookmarks, emails, multimedia files, snippets, and notes that comprise our digital life. The good news: there are many solid productivity and organization applications for the Mac to help reduce your clutter, most of which offer ample free trial periods. The bad news: they all claim to be the perfect solution for organizing your mess of information. Which app to choose?

That’s what I’m trying to answer here by taking a thorough look at a selection of some of the more popular Mac-based info managers. Personally, it’s a good time for me to tackle this. While I’ve used Yojimbo for several years, I’m not sure it’s the app I want to stick with. Since Yojimbo recently released version 2 of the app (requiring a $20 upgrade fee), I want to better understand my alternatives before paying out.

If you’re familiar with the backstory to this series, you know that I’ve struggled with identifying which apps to include. Now I’ve nailed down the list to include EagleFiler, Yojimbo, Together, SOHO Notes, and Circus Ponies Notebook. My selection criteria is based on several factors: personal interest, popularity in the Mac community, and reader feedback from the early days of this series. As I already covered Yojimbo when I began this series, I’m not going to review it again in full. Instead, I’ll present a short update to reflect what’s new and notable in version 2. I recognize that this is not a complete list, but it’s a decent cross-section.

A key challenge I’ve faced in preparing to review these apps is one of classification. These tools do many different things, but they have common elements. One goal of this project is to find a way to tie them all together in some sort of framework. I think I now have a decent working model. When we last left off (a long time ago), I proposed that information managers for the Mac generally fall in three main categories:

Finders

These applications strive to serve up something better than Apple’s Finder to archive, organize, and search through your important documents. Apps in this category tend to focus on giving you powerful metadata tools to help you find what you need and organize your existing documents/files. Examples are Leap, PathFinder, EagleFiler, Together, DEVONThink.

Creators

These apps focus on providing a better notebook experience. They provide a central repository to create and collect notes, ideas, snippets, multimedia clips, and (to a lesser extent) existing documents. Simple interfaces, quick entry, and rapid search are emphasized. Examples are Yojimbo, Evernote, Notebook, VooDooPad

Visualizers

These applications focus on providing a better creative space in which to help you plan projects, discover relationships, and gain insight into your data. Examples are Curio, Tinderbox, OmniOutliner.



How do we tie these categories together? I originally tried placing the categories on a linear spectrum, but several readers pointed out that a triangle plot would be more apropos. I have to agree (for the backstory on this, read the comments of the Spectrum of PIM post). So here’s the triangle, in all its glory:

info manager triangle

The idea behind the triangle is that there’s a lot of overlap in function between the various info management tools out there, so this plot is a way to show where an app falls in terms of utility as a file organizer (F=Find), note creator (C=Create), or visualizer (V=Visualize). The corners of the triangle represent 100% Finder (bottom left point), 100% Creator (top point), and 100% Visualizer (bottom right point). The farther you get away from any one of these points, the lower the percentage for a given category.

If you’re not familiar with how to read this sort of plot, it’s easiest to see how it works by way of example. And since this isn’t an exact science, I’ll employ a simpler version of the triangle for my reviews. Here’s what the triangle plot looks like sans percentage lines for EagleFiler, as an example:

EagleFiler Triangle Plot

I place EagleFiler at a location that represents about 75% file organizer, 20% notebook, and 5% visualization tool. Make sense?

I’ve included Visualizers in this model based on the recognition that is an important sub-category of the genre, but I’ve decided to limit my reviews to tools that fall more in the finder and creator categories. Still, it’s useful to include visualizers for two reasons. First, some of finder/creator focused-apps have functions that fall within the visualization realm. Second, some of the visualizing tools on the market include note-taking and file organizational features. My hope is that the triangle will, at a minimum, provide a handy way to think about any given info management tool (even if that app isn’t covered in this particular series, and even if you don’t agree with my where I place a particular app). In other words, this framework hopefully accommodates all or most of the apps that fall within the broader ‘information manager’ category.

OK. That’s enough about the triangle.

In closing, I want to reemphasize a few points I previously made to set the stage for the resumption of these reviews: some of these tools focus on organization, some on creating new info, and some focus most on tying together all stuff into some sort of coherent package so we can find our way forward. There aren’t necessarily clear winners that do it all. Our challenge is to pick the right apps to do the job in a way that is natural for us. It may mean using more than one info management tool.

The question, then, is how do these various organizers measure up? I’ll be looking at the aforementioned apps with a focus on answering the following questions:

1. Could I figure out how to use the application with minimal fuss (preferably without referring to documentation)?
2. Was I still enthusiastic about using the application after a week of use?
3. How well does the app integrate into the Mac OS?
4. How well could I manage all of my tasks (work, home, play, etc.)
5. How did the program ‘feel?’ How ‘mac-like’ is it?

Now on to the reviews.

Upgrading to WordPress 2.9

I just upgraded to WordPress 2.9, neglecting beforehand to deactivate my plugins. This is a mistake. If you’re using WP.org and install updates manually as I do, ensure you turn your plugins off. Also ensure you take the time to back up your site and your MySQL database. It’s worth the extra effort in case anything else goes wrong.

At any rate, after I performed the update, I could see my site but was unable to access wp-admin. The solution: I removed all of my plugins using my FTP client. It loaded without a problem after that. Then I added the plugins back one at a time until I found the offending item. In my case, it was WP Security Scan. I’m sure the developer of this plugin will release an update imminently, but it is currently incompatible with the 2.9. Once I removed it, all was well.

in tip | 147 Words

The DNS choice

Last week, the tech world was abuzz with the launch of Google’s new public Domain Name System (DNS) resolution service.

Since I posted a while back about OpenDNS, I thought I’d share my thoughts on this subject. The main question I set out to answer is whether or not I should switch from OpenDNS to Google’s Public DNS?

As I began this experiment, my most important criteria was speed. Which service offers the fastest browsing experience? To answer that, I searched around and discovered this helpful post on TechSutraGoogle DNS vs OpenDNS: Google Rocks for International Users.

One of the readers over at TechSutra (Stevan Bajić) wrote the following bash script to test out the speed of four popular alternative DNS services. To use this script, run this in terminal (you can enter any domains you want here):


#!/bin/sh
isp=$(dig +noall +stats 2>&1 | awk '$2~/^SERVER:$/{split($3,dnsip,"#");print dnsip[1]}');
m="-------------------------------------------------------------------------------";
s=" ";
h="+${m:0:25}+${m:0:12}+${m:0:12}+${m:0:12}+${m:0:12}+${m:0:12}+";
header=("Domain${s:0:23}" "Your ISP${s:0:10}" "Google${s:0:10}" "4.2.2.2${s:0:10}" "OpenDNS${s:0:10}" "DNS Adv.${s:0:10}");
echo "${h}";
echo "| ${header[0]:0:23} | ${header[1]:0:10} | ${header[2]:0:10} | ${header[3]:0:10} | ${header[4]:0:10} | ${header[5]:0:10} |";
echo "${h}";
for i in "lifehacker.com" "facebook.com" "viewfromthedock.com" "reddit.com" "tb4.fr" "bbc.co.uk";
do
ii="${i}${s:23}";
echo -ne "| ${ii:0:23} |";
for j in "${isp}" "8.8.8.8" "4.2.2.2" "208.67.222.222" "156.154.70.1";
do
r="${s:10}$(dig +noall +stats +time=9 @${j} ${i} 2>&1 | awk '$2~/^Query$/{print $4" "$5}')";
echo -ne " ${r:${#r}-10} |";
done
echo -ne "n${h}n";
done

I ran tests at different times of the day, and on different days. For me, OpenDNS and Google were consistently fast. Results for Level3, DNS Advantage, and my ISP varied widely (sometimes I’d get decent results, sometimes response times were abysmal).

While the results I received from Google and OpenDNS were best, the difference in speed between the two was negligible. We’re talking milliseconds here, after all. I don’t think I’m really going to notice the difference between a response time of, say, 11 ms and 13ms (although research indicates that milliseconds do makes a difference).

 

One think to keep in mind is that the initial test you perform may return slower results than subsequent tests for some obscure sites. The first time you search for www.threetastes.com, for example, (my wife’s blog) the DNS service will likely have to go out and get this IP address from an authoritative server. After that first lookup, the IP will be cached with the DNS server, so the response time will be quicker for subsequent tests. In short, run multiple tests.

My results jibe with those coming in from readers at TechSutra: that OpenDNS may have a slight edge for many U.S. locations, while Google DNS may have the edge for users outside of the U.S. Best to test it out the alternatives for yourself.

So, I’ve established that Google DNS and OpenDNS offer comparably faster DNS lookups compared to my ISP. Both services also offer security features to make browsing safer (my ISP may have these features, but I have no way of knowing what’s going as these details aren’t published. I have greater confidence that Google and OpenDNS DNS servers are not and will not be compromised).

Now, which to choose?

1. Do I want to use yet another Google service?

I’m not too worried about this. Google privacy policy is very clear. I’ve experienced no cause for concern with my Google services.

2. Do I have a problem with the way OpenDNS operates?

When I began this comparison, the answer was ‘not really.’ After pondering this for a while, I have to say I do have a problem. With OpenDNS, if you type in a domain that does not exist, you are redirected to an OpenDNS ad-based search page. This is bad behavior. I knew this already, but I didn’t worry about. I turned off NX Domain redirection in my OpenDNS user settings. Here’s the part that annoys me: OpenDNS describes this feature as ‘typo correction,’ but say nothing about how this is tied to redirection to their own ad page if the domain can’t be resolved. They should take a cue from Google and explain this more clearly. Sure, this service corrects typos (changes .cmo to .com, for example), but this is only a minor feature of a service that’s really about generating revenue from the mistakes people make in entering URLs. In addition, when you perform a Google Search using OpenDNS, your request is redirected to an OpenDNS server before going to Google by default. This may also be turned off (by unchecking ‘Enable OpenDNS Proxy’) but it’s not really clear how to do it. And let’s face it, most users aren’t going to mess with OpenDNS advanced settings. Lastly, you must have BOTH ‘Enable OpenDNS Proxy’ and ‘Typo Correction’ turned on to enjoy the benefits of OpenDNS’ content filtering features (one of the big reasons people like OpenDNS).

Here’s the bottom line: OpenDNS offers a fast DNS service that includes many extra free or pay features. It’s a good option if you need those extra features and aren’t worried about the way the service handles your requests. The main gripe I have with OpenDNS is that they are not transparent about how they’re doing business. Google, on the other hand, offers a fast DNS service and reliable security features. It’s a good option if you don’t need extra bells and whistles.

Think I’ll switch over to Google DNS.

iPhone App Freebies and Sales Abound

This may be old news to most readers, but in case you’ve missed it, Blacksmith Games has organized a holiday giveaway of one iPhone game per day for the month of December. It’s called Appvent Calendar 09. Some of the games are quite good. Today, for example, you can pick up an excellent well-designed, and beautifully illustrated game called Blimp from Craneballs Studios (normally $2.99).

Also of note on the App store, Nuance Communications recently released a very impressive spoken word-to-text translation tool called Dragon Dictation. It’s free for a limited time. I’m very impressed with the accuracy of the app. It’s produced using the same engine behind the popular (and expensive) desktop clients Dragon Naturally Speaking and Mac Dictation. Once you capture your text, you can copy it to the clipboard, email it, or send it as a text message. Note that the app works by ferrying your voice recording to servers at Nuance, hence you need a WiFi or cellular connection. While translation speeds are zippy over WiFi, it’s a bit slow on my Edge connection. Of course, it’ll be faster on the 3G network. It’s definitely worth picking up while it’s free.

Last but not least, it’s worth your time and effort to monitor price drops and giveaways on the App store this month. There are a ton of one-day-only and limited-time holiday deals hitting the store each day. I use a free iPhone/Touch app called AppMiner to keep on top of the deals. Appshopper.com and 148apps.com are also good places to monitor price drops and promotions online.

in tip | 262 Words

Free Snail-Mail Holiday Postcard from Gmail

snail-mail holiday card on your behalf to a (U.S.-based) recipient of your choice. There are six Gmail-themed cards to choose from.

A kind gesture? A small test of a future Google service? A subtle nudge to get would-be Gmail users online? The Gmail team says it’s simply a ‘token of appreciation to our most enthusiastic fans.’ My guess is that the offer will be up a week or less before they’re overwhelmed by requests.

in tip | 77 Words